Zumba: The only requirement is to have a good time

This post was originally published in 2011. The tips and techniques explained may be outdated.

by Diana Thiel (guest post), , 0 Comments
Silvia Missing

Silvia Missing

Zumba is a colloquial Spanish word that basically means “moving fast and having fun.” In the 1990s, fitness instructor and choreographer Alberto “Beto” Perez combined dance and fitness with a Latin beat, and Zumba was born.
The Zumba wave came to the United States in 2001 and has since spread around the world. Germany is no exception. It seems that everywhere you look, people in bright, colorful tops and pants are happily dancing away to loud music.

Checking out Zumba at SMA

Our apprentice checking out Zumba at SMA

Our apprentice checking out Zumba at SMA

So when Work-Life Balance Day rolled around, I took advantage of the opportunity to try this lively workout. For 30 minutes, I moved my elbows, hips, feet, and hands to the uplifting beat. Along with about 20 other young SMA employees, I was swept along by the cheerful energy of the woman leading the class.
It was more strenuous than I had expected, but a look around the room left no doubt: This was fun. And according to the Zumba instructor, that is exactly the goal of every class.

Zumba improves conditioning and coordination

Zumba improves conditioning and coordination

When participants are having fun, the steps and movements come naturally. Almost as a side effect, Zumba improves conditioning and coordination, while also providing some exhilaration.

Here’s my conclusion: You have to try it sometime. I’m going to grab a friend and join a Zumba class. I look forward to telling you all about it.

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